Digital Legal Lab

The Digital Legal Lab is a leading research hub that pioneers the understanding of how digital technologies interact with law and justice. Each of the four Dutch law schools participating in the research collaboration bring their own unique scientific focus and expertise. Discover more here.

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What we are working on

Discover our research
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The Digital Legal Lab brings together four scientific institutions across the Netherlands specializing in law & technology, each with their own unique research strengths and expertise. Keep scrolling to find out more about the research at each of our collaboration's participating partner institutions.

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Digital Legal Studies at

Tilburg University
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From Regulating Human Behavior to Regulating Data

Tilburg University is the coordinating partner of the Digital Legal Lab. The consortium is hosted by the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology, and Society (TILT) at Tilburg Law School. Led by dr. Inge Graef and dr. Bart van der Sloot, the Tilburg team focuses on the shifting paradigm of regulation in the era of big data, artificial intelligence, and robotics. Researchers across different disciplines aim to map, understand and – if possible – help shape the shift from human-centric regulation to data-centric regulation.

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Digital Legal Studies at

University of Amsterdam
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The Digital Transformation of Decision-Making

At the University of Amsterdam, the Digital Legal Lab consortium is hosted by the Institute for Information Law (IViR). Led by prof. dr. Natali Helberger, prof. dr. Mireille van Eechoud and prof. dr. Joris van Hoboken, the Amsterdam team focuses on automated decision-making (ADM) systems, which are set to replace human decision makers in a range of areas, from justice, to media, commerce, health and labor.

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Digital Legal Studies at

Radboud University
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Digital Conflict Resolution

At Radboud University, the Digital Legal Lab consortium is hosted by the university’s Faculty of Law. Led by prof. dr. André Janssen, prof. dr. Pietro Ortolani and dr. Pieter Wolters, the Nijmegen team explores the ways in which digitalisation affects (legal) conflict resolution. Researchers with different backgrounds and perspectives jointly focus on 4 main research topics: the digitalisation of courts and legal practice, alternative digital conflict resolution, enforcement in a digital world, and the legal requirements of digital information security.

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Digital Legal Studies at

Maastricht University
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Developing Technology for Law

The Maastricht Law & Tech Lab that hosts the consortium at Maastricht University is a unique research group with 7 computer scientists in residence. The Maastricht team, led by prof. dr. Gijs van Dijck, focuses on creating sustainable digital-legal research infrastructures. The highly interdisciplinary team’s aim is to create a database that stores and links metadata – initially focusing on publicly available judicial and legislative datasets – that is suitable for testing and developing analytical tools (AI), in order to answer (empirical) legal research questions.

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The law sector plan

OUR RESEARCH NETWORK is funded by THE DUTCH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, CULTURE AND SCIENCE (OCW), in consultation with nwo, THROUGH THE LAW SECTOR PLAN. 

Through sector plans, the Netherlands invests in innovative scientific research and academic talent. The Law Sector Plan – as part of the broader Sectorplan Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) – incorporates several legal science themes. Our collaboration focuses on expanding and advancing one of those research themes: Digital Legal Studies.

The partner universities

Tilburg university
From Regulating Human Behavior to Regulating Data

Tilburg University is the coordinating partner of the Digital Legal Studies collaboration. The consortium is hosted by the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology, and Society (TILT) at Tilburg Law School.

Led by prof. dr. Ronald Leenes, the Tilburg team focuses on the shifting paradigm of regulation in the era of big data, artificial intelligence, and robotics. Researchers across different disciplines aim to map, understand and – if possible – help shape the shift from human-centric regulation to data-centric regulation.
 
University of Amsterdam
The Digital Transformation of Decision-Making
 
The University of Amsterdam is a partner in the Digital Legal Studies consortium. The faculty that hosts the consortium is the Amsterdam Law School, spearheaded by the Institute for Information Law (IViR).
 
Led by prof. dr. Natali Helberger, prof. dr. Mireille van Eechoud and prof. dr. Joris van Hoboken, the Amsterdam team focuses on automated decision-making (ADM) systems, which are set to replace human decision makers in a range of areas, from justice, to media, commerce, health and labor. Read more on the research initiative’s own website.
 
Radboud university Nijmegen
Digital Conflict Resolution

At Radboud University Nijmegen, the Digital Legal Studies consortium is hosted by the university’s Faculty of Law.
 
Led by prof. dr. André Janssen, the Nijmegen team explores the ways in which digitalisation affects (legal) conflict resolution. Researchers with different backgrounds and perspectives jointly focus on 4 main research topics: the digitalisation of courts and legal practice, alternative digital conflict resolution, enforcement in a digital world, and the legal requirements of digital information security.
 
maastricht university
Developing Technology for Law
 
The Law & Tech Lab that hosts the consortium at Maastricht University is a unique research group with 7 computer scientists in residence.
 
The Maastricht team, led by prof. dr. Gijs van Dijck, focuses on creating sustainable digital-legal research infrastructures. The highly interdisciplinary team’s aim is to create a database that stores and links metadata – initially focusing on publicly available judicial and legislative datasets – that is suitable for testing and developing analytical tools (AI), in order to answer (empirical) legal research questions. Read more here.